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26 March 2018
Welcome to The Cheshire Group eNewsletter

From The Cheshire Press (an imprint of The Cheshire Group)... Our newest publication is the sixth in the series of novels from Nancy L Parsons. In The Ghost and the Forger, all the elements of a Nell BaneThe Ghost and the Forger novel come into play: psychology, ethics and intrigue.…H.H. Willoughby is a forger by profession, and he wants to write his memoir. To do this, he needs a ghostwriter so he engages Nell Bane. Willoughby is an endearing fellow—charming and engaging—but their partnership carries Nell to the limits of the law and causes her to wonder if she is aiding and abetting a criminal. Furthermore, the ominous presence of Willoughby’s accomplice, Woodford Stone, haunts Nell and foreshadows trouble as the novel’s action moves through museums, studios and art galleries.You can order a copy of this book for yourself or as a gift just click on this link.


HOW TO WRITE MAGNETIC KEYWORDS.

You may not be your company's web master but it is possible that someday you'll be challenged to come up with keywords for your company's web site, or for some other purpose.
     Keywords, just briefly, are literally "keys" that unlock the databases, or indexes on search engines. They are also words that a web visitor might use to initiate a search for you or your company.
     Fred Marckini, author of Secrets to Achieving a Top Ten Position, has developed a few tips for writing powerful keywords. Here are some of his ideas.
     1. Chose your words carefully. Make lists of words that people are apt to use to look for you. These are keywords. You can make them more magnetic by creating power combinations that help refine searches. Combine keywords into phrases. Think of different ways to say the same thing. If cheap hotels is one of your keywords, you might also write inexpensive hotels.
     2. Consider misspelling a few keywords. For example, if you often see the typo hotle for hotel, you may have a powerful keywords there. Bad spellers may be good customers too.
     3. Location may be important. For instance, cheap hotels Boston may put people on your page.
     4. Use long versions and plurals of your keywords. Some search engines use word stemming—i.e. they search for word roots. If ski is one of your keywords, consider using skiing; word stemming search engines will catch both ski and skiing.
     5. Avoid stop words. To save space most search engines skip articles and common words like a, the, and, an, of, that, too, web and homepage. Try to edit out stop words,
     One last tip" when writing keywords, offer to host a brainstorming session with several others. Think outside the box and try to get as many words and combinations as possible. You can always weed out the weaklings later. The person charged with preparing your website for the search engines will be much more successful if the keywords he or she has to work with are as strong as they can possibly be.
 

WHIM ON A TUESDAY.

"What struck me on a wet Tuesday morning as a moderately good idea made me famous" wrote David Ogilvy in Confessions of an Advertising Man. The moderately good idea involved ducking into a drugstore on the way to an ad presentation and buying it for $1.50, an eye patch.
     Ogilvy & Mather had just gotten the task of of introducing the Hathaway shirt to the national market. The young Man in rhe eye patchshirtmaker longed for the brand recognition that the Arrow Shirt Man had achieved for the Arrow company. The catch was Arrow had spent two million dollars for that brand recognition. Hathaway only had thirty thousand.
     Ogilvy's creative people came up with eighteen approaches. The eighteenth involved a model wearing an eye patch. but this concept was regarded as weak and was set aside.
     David Ogilvy's spur-of-the-moment purchase was a whim that revived the eighteenth concept. It also worked a miracle.
     The Hathaway people had the sense to let Ogilvy run with the concept and as Ogilvy himself said, "I just dressed the man in a shirt and an eye patch and photographed him in places where I'd most like to find myself; conducting the New York Philharmonic in Carnegie Hall, playing the oboe, driving a tractor, fencing..."
     Is there a moral here? There is if you want to construct one. How about...never stifle a good impulse?


EMAIL TIPS - PART THREE.

What are the easiest things you can do—without adding significant costs—to improve email response rates right now?

Another area that is simple and yet often underused is styled "alt text." More than 67% of all email messages receive block images by default. However, in many cases, instead of seeing the images that are included in the email, the recipient will see alt text, which is copy controlled in most cases by the email sender.[It may be a good idea for the sender to add "title text" in the code in order for the alternative text to appear].
     Marketers have the option to use styled alt text, allowing for the alteration of the text font, color, size, style and weight. This styled version will display in the majority of email recipient inboxes instead of the images that are most often not getting displayed. Testing the copy and styling in this area is important because more recipients may ultimately see this information.
     Lastly, consider time zone-adjusted email deployments, Time of day matters more than ever in driving email performance. Acquisition email campaigns that are delivered after noon see a 26% drop-off in performance compared with those delivered earlier. Thus setting your send schedule based on the time-zone of the recipient is critical.
     The optimal window for performance is to have your acquisition email delivered between 5:30 a.m. and 10 a.m. local time. To focus on just one time zone is doing your campaign a massive disservice.

     

Business to Business Online
May 2013


WHOEVER SAID ENGLISH HISTORY IS BORING.
Part Three.
 

Here are some more facts about England in the 1500s:

Houses had thatched roofs, thick straw piled high, with no wood underneath. It was the only place for animals to get warm, so all the cats and other small animals (mice, bugs) lived in the roof. When it rained it became slippery and sometimes the animals would slip and fall off the roof. Hence the saying "It's raining cats and dogs."

There was nothing to stop things from falling into the house. This posed a real problem in the bedroom, where bugs and other droppings could mess up your nice clean bed. Hence, a bed with big posts and a sheet hung over the top afforded some protection.That's how canopy beds came into existence.


to be continued.

 

Thanks to BMT reader
Hella Beale
Rosendale NY



Click here to visit the NFIB websiteWe are a proud member of the National Federation of Independent Business. For more information click on the logo.

The Cheshire Group is a full service Print and Digital Advertising Agency. We offer services for Web Site Development & Maintenance, Search Engine Marketing, Search Engine Optimization, Print and Digital Media Advertising, Brochures, Direct Marketing and Publicity. Our Cheshire Press imprint offers on-demand print book and e-newsletter publishing. Our book publications are available in print and digital versions

How to Write Magnetic Keywords.

Whim on a Tuesday.
Email Tips Part Three.
Whoever Said English History is Boring-Part Three?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"A competitor is a guy in the revolving door behind you and comes out ahead of you."

George Romney

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


"Nothing focuses the mind better than a competitor who wants to wipe you off the map."

Wayne Calloway

  

 
 

 


"Even if you're on the right track, you'll get run over if you just sit there."

Will Rogers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Build a better mouse-trap and the world will beat a path to your door."

Ralph Waldo Emerson

You can build it but they don't have to come. Let your market know the product is there.

Advertise!
Promote!
Communicate!

THE BETTER MOUSE- TRAP helps you do it. To do it even better call The Cheshire Group at
978 475-1478 or visit us at:
www.cheshiregroup.com

Please send us an email and let us know your thoughts on The Better Mousetrap.
Your comments and questions are welcome.